Defend Europa
News » Population Replacement » Population Replacement: Demographic Changes to Spain
Population Replacement

Population Replacement: Demographic Changes to Spain

Spain, the Iberian nation based in Southern Europe, is another one of the countries facing demographic changes. Will Spain be Spain only in name in the future?

Throughout many European countries, the birth rate remains low and it is below replacement level. The rate for Spain was at a level of 1.31 births per woman in 2017. This means that in the future, the Spanish population will decrease by 10 million if the fertility rate continues this way. This is not the only problem for Spain. Over the past two decades, immigration to the nation has been rising, and in 2018 alone, it has seen a significant rise in arrivals from Africa and that figure is set to continue increasing.

 

Spain’s Demographics Throughout History

In order to examine the demographics of Spain it is important to go back in time. In 1900, Spain only had a population of 18 million but the birth rate was extremely high. The fertility rate at this time period was around 4.5 children per woman. This meant that each year over 600,000 babies were being born and this figure continued until the 1970s. After 1980, the birth rate started to fall and it each year, it has continued to reduce. This was also 5 years after the death of Francisco Franco and from then Spain became a democracy.

During the Franco era, it was encouraged for women to have children and the government would offer prizes and incentives to a family which had many children. Twenty years later and the birth rate has in fact halved. In the 1990s, the birth rate figures were over 300,000 on a yearly basis. During that period both the PSOE (Partido Social Obrero Espanol), in other words the Spanish Socialist party, and the Partido Popular, the Spanish conservative party had periods of power. However during their stints in power the birth rate still did not rise above 400,000. The birth rate only went above after 2001.

Head of State and President of Spanish Government, Francisco Franco, sitting with his family. Madrid, 1960.

 

In the early 2000s, Spain received a wave of immigration which has increased the population. From the early 2000s to 2011, the Spanish population increased by 6 million and this did raise the birth rates. But it is also important to consider where did the immigration came from. Was it European or did if come from the third world? The statistics show that much of the immigration did come from South America. The majority of South America has a vast amount of Spanish speakers so Spain would seem a popular destination for them to go to. According to the National Statistics on the Spanish Government Websites, it gives the following backgrounds of the foreign citizens that were born in another country. In total it makes up over 4 million which make up to almost 10% of the entire Spanish population. The following percentages are given below on where Spain’s immigration has come from according to the government statistics:

  • Asia & Oceania (6.4%)
  • Africa (16.3 %)
  • South America (31%)
  • Rest of Europe (37.6%)

This overall may not seem so terrible for Spain compared to other European countries but it is about to get a whole lot worse.

 

Today’s Problems in Spain

At Present, the Spanish face many problems which will all contribute to their replacement. Due to the high unemployment in Spain for the past decade due to the economic crash in 2008, it has resulted in an exodus in young Spaniards to South America and other parts of Europe in search of better working conditions. Meanwhile Cultural Marxism is rampant and rife with the promotion of feminism, abortion and the LGBTQ agenda. There is also internal conflict within the autonomous regions of Spain with the issue of separatists from Catalonia and the Basque region. This would seem like an ideal diversion for the global elites who wish to distract the native Spanish from noticing their demographic replacement.

Feminist March in Spain, April 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spain also has a problem with Islamisation where the Muslim population was at 1.8 million in 2016, however this will have increased since then due to higher birth rates among the Muslim population and further immigration since 2016. One may have also noticed the Islamic radicalisation with the Ramblas terrorist attack and the attack at the beach in Cambrils in August, 2017. The amount of mosques is also growing due to an increasing Muslim population and funding from Morocco.

In relation to the ethnicity breakdown of the Spanish Population, there is a lack of information available online from any national census so it is difficult to predict when the natives may become a minority and exactly what their percentage figure currently lies at. Nevertheless it is clear that it is decreasing with the declining birth rates and the increased immigration from Africa and the Middle East in 2018 since the Pedro Sanchez of the PSOE took power. The socialist party is in favour of accepting these immigrants and providing them welfare. They also wish to distribute them over the country. At present the areas affected most by diversity in Spain include the East and Southern coast, the Balearic Islands and the capital Madrid.

 

The Invasion at Spain’s border.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since this wave of immigration has begun, the crime rates have risen and the amount of assaults against women has risen and the Spanish congress does not have a single party who is speaking out against this. However to put a good touch to the bad news, there is the newly formed right wing party called VOX Espana. They are in favour of a united Spain, a firm end to the opened Spanish border, to third world immigration, and to provide a boost in the fertility rates. It is unknown how aware the Spanish population is to the problem they are facing but with all regards, the number of white liberals is decreasing while the number of awoken Europeans is increasing and this phenomena is occurring not just in Spain but the rest of the European continent.

Links:

https://elpais.com/elpais/2015/01/13/inenglish/1421140333_379388.html

https://www.euronews.com/2018/07/31/immigration-debate-flares-up-in-spain-as-migrant-arrivals-shoot-up

Related posts

France: 20% of 2016 French Newborns Found to Have a Muslim First Name

Le Savoisien

IQ on the down in Norway and Denmark

Borna

Have Some Cheese with that Whine: Cheddar Man as Migrant Avatar

Publius

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More