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Children’s Television: From Rainbow to Multi-Racial, LGBT Brainwashing in 40 Years

Television - LGBT

This morning, I awoke to learn that my beloved childhood hero, Geoffrey Hayes, had passed away at the age of 76. He was the star of British television show, Rainbow, which aired over 1000 episodes between the years of 1972 and 1995. Rainbow was a show in which Geoffrey would carry out activities and read stories with his three puppet friends: Bungle the bear, George the hippo and Zippy the…. Zippy. There were episodes where the group of friends would go to the funfair to play games, visit the farm, dress up as pirates and go swimming; it was all-round, good, respectable fun.

Apart from one comedy episode which was recorded specifically for adults in which the stars made a number of cheeky innuendos, Rainbow was created for the innocent mind of a child. It taught children to be kind, to say please and thank you, and to share. In between scenes, two men and a pretty, young blonde woman, Rod, Jane and Freddy, would hit our screens and sing us songs about going for picnics and not talking to strangers. Life was easy and simple, and the only disagreements or difficulties we saw were over who got to choose what they’d watch on television or who hadn’t cleaned up their mess properly.

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Rod, Jane and Freddy

 

I was saddened by Geoffrey’s passing this morning, and not simply because my favourite childhood television show has now indefinitely come to an end. I feel like a little bit of England has died with him. A little bit of our past. A little bit of what was good. Something wholesome, safe and pure has gone, and it will no doubt make way for more mixed-raced, globo-homo propaganda, aimed at indoctrinating our children into a lifetime of self-hatred and confusion.

The state-funded BBC now teaches our children that they have no real identity and that Jamal, who moved here from Pakistan and voted for Brexit, is just as British as they are. Thomas the Tank Engine has received a makeover in a bid to achieve gender equality and represent multicultural Britain. The show now features Charubala, a female railway controller from India. Steven Universe, a cartoon first aired in 2013, features on Cartoon Network and stars various gender-confused and non-binary characters. The show also boasts the title of broadcasting television’s first animated same-sex kiss and same-sex marriage. Other Cartoon Network shows, such as Adventure Time, have followed suit with various LGBT themes. Drag Tots, a television show which aired in June of this year, is a cartoon aimed at children and adults alike, featuring baby (yes baby!) drag queens, who spend their time visiting wig shops and insulting each other. It was also revealed last month that Sesame Street writer, Mark Saltzman, has decided that show favourites, Bert and Ernie, are now a homosexual couple. The official Sesame Street Twitter account, however, has subsequently denied this.

Where will this end? How far is this going to go? Television shows are now outright lying to our children about Britain’s history and made-up gender nonsense in a bid to push an unwanted multicultural, LGBTQ+ utopia into their minds from the offset, before they’re even old enough to understand what normal is. Now that the mainstream media are normalising paedophilia too, how long will it be until we see a cartoon featuring a non-offending paedophile? It sounds extreme, but we are on a slippery slope, and this is where we’re heading.

The rainbow once represented to me a 15-minute slot full of innocence and wholesomeness. It now represents something much more macabre. Perhaps this comparison really does highlight how far it often feels like Britain has fallen.

Now is as good a time as any, if you haven’t already, to turn off your television.

 

television
RIP Geoffrey Hayes, 1942 – 2018

 

 

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